We enter this world with certain predetermined facts—such as our sex, parents, and nationality. What we do with those facts can chart the course of our lives.  A baby born to Kurdish parents in Turkey faces life-altering obstacles. A baby born to black couples in America has her/his share of troubles. Turkey claims it is… Continue reading

If you glance at the English newspapers on any given day, you will hardly come across the word martyr. If you do the same with the Turkish ones, the word will leap out at you and sometimes in bold letters. Turkish soldiers are dying in Syria, Libya and Kurdistan. Turkish media is hailing them as… Continue reading

A coup may erupt in Turkey, where half of Middle Eastern Kurds live. At least that’s the prediction of the RAND Corporation, an American think tank. That should alarm those who believe, as I do, that the worst of civilian governments are better than the best of military dictatorships. Although Turkey has a civilian government… Continue reading

Like many Kurds who dabble in politics, I was admittedly rattled upon hearing the news of Qasem Soleimani’s assassination in Baghdad. There is no other word for it, the man cast a large shadow over Kurdistan. Will his elimination mean more sunlight or greater darkness for the Kurds? I fear the latter, as I posted… Continue reading

August 30, 2019 Wedat Aydin didn’t have a say in why he was born a Kurd in an international colony called Kurdistan part of which is now reeling under the jackboots of the Turkish Army. Nor did he have a say in why he was born in 1954 only to be kidnapped and brutally murdered by monsters masquerading as… Continue reading

“Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.”—Voltaire Dear Mr. Coelho, You are hot news in Kurdistan—among its lovers of literature to be exact. But we can’t yet award you any literary prize for honoring our homeland and its hapless children in your novel, Eleven Minutes. Perhaps we should. We also… Continue reading

You could say that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan played with fire—and got burned. Even better—it was Kurds who lit the flame. It started when Mr. Erdogan noticed his handpicked candidate for mayor of Istanbul, Binali Yildirim, was losing in the polls. In desperation, he turned to Abdullah Ocalan, the imprisoned leader of Kurdistan Workers’… Continue reading

The residents of Istanbul are getting ready to vote again next Sunday. Turks are divided, making Kurds the most critical voting block in the history of Turkish elections. The city supports 15 million souls, 3 million of whom hail from Kurdistan. The Kurds hold the deciding vote, noted Ertugrul Kurkcu in a Father’s Day tweet.… Continue reading